Register
 (photo: Anna Nekrashevich)
08.03.2021, 14:51

Hybrid Working and Desk Data

EMEA, Data Security

Mark Harper explains why businesses and their remote workers must remain vigilant when it comes to physical document security in homes.

 

Pre-Covid-19, home offices were often that neglected room in people’s homes. But today, things are different. After the initial lockdown in 2020, 46.6 per cent of UK workers did some work at home with 86 per cent of those doing so because of the pandemic.

 

Since then, many have found that over time, those semi-permanent workspaces have become slightly more permanent – with official hybrid working coming into effect for an assortment of businesses and their teams. The adoption of hybrid working can in fact be seen as one of the few positives to come from the pandemic, with less travel, more freedom and higher productivity top of the benefits list for businesses and their employees.

 

But those welcomed benefits don’t tell the whole story. The transition to remote working has undoubtedly impacted workplace security, with various touch points at risk. The handling of sensitive documents for example, is a growing concern for office managers. In simpler times, sensitive data was more or less contained in an office space, but with millions of home setups to now think about, how can businesses and their office managers control the issue of desk data?

 

Security Concerns

As of January 2021, it’s said that one in three UK workers are based exclusively at home. That’s millions of individuals from a variety of sectors, all of which must continue in their efforts to remain data secure. With that, reports of cyber security fears are consistently making the news but that shouldn’t be the sole focus. There is also the underlying, but growing, issue of physical document security.

 

The move to remote working hasn’t removed these physical forms of data – think hard drives, USBs and paper based documentation. A recent surge in demand for home printers for example, only exemplifies the use of physical documents and the potential security issues home offices are facing. Adding to that, research conducted in 2020 found that two out of three employees who printed documents at home admitted to binning those documents both in and outside of their house without shredding them.­­

 

Those findings present a huge data security concern, one that must be fixed immediately. The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has since released guidance for those working from their bedrooms and dining tables. Designed to help overcome these challenges, the ‘security checklists’ and ‘top tips’ should be the first port of call for many. Yet throughout, the ICO make reference to ‘following your organisation’s policies and guidance’ – highlighting that the onus isn’t solely on the individuals working from their makeshift offices.

 

Desk Hopping

Office managers have a monumental task on their hands to ensure teams are well equipped within their home setups. Without the right equipment, policies and guidance, businesses are sure to be at risk. But it would be wrong to insinuate that unsecure desk data has only now become an issue for organisations. Keeping clear desks has long been a battle for many office managers. In fact, clear desk policies are practised in most modern office spaces, with it recognised as a key preventative to personal information being wrongly accessed and so falling foul of GDPR legislation.

 

However, the unsupervised aspect of home working has led to a potentially more lax approach to these policies, or in some cases, they can’t be followed at all. For those taking a more laid back approach, organisation leaders must remind staff of their data security responsibilities and why clear desk policies have previously proven effective. Ultimately, throwing sensitive documents in the bin was never an option pre-pandemic and this must be carried through to home workspaces now.

 

There are also concerns over the equipment people have access to at home. For example, without a reliable home shredding solution, data security suddenly becomes a tougher task. To add to that, several recommendations state that employees working from home should avoid throwing documents away by instead transporting them to the office for shredding once lockdown rules ease. While this is an option, it does pose further issues, with document security at risk of accidental loss or even theft throughout the transportation period, not to mention the time spent in storage.

 

The best and most effective way to securely destroy documents is at the source, especially in environments where higher levels of personal data is regularly handled. Only when home workers implement their own clear desk policies alongside the correct shredding equipment (at the correct security level), can both home office spaces and regular offices become data secure. Realistically, these solutions should, like the common home printer, become a staple in home office spaces moving forward.

 

Clear Minds

The likelihood is that many UK workers will remain in their home offices for the foreseeable future, only to emerge as hybrid workers post-pandemic. And while the current working environment is more ideal for some than others, the recent findings on home office behavior represents a true security risk to organisations.

 

With this in mind, it’s now more key than ever for business leaders, their office managers and homeworkers to all step up and get a handle on home data security policies (as well as maintaining their standards back at the office) – starting with the implementation of clear desk policies. After all, a clear desk equals a clear mind.

 

  

Sources

https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/employmentandemployeetypes/bulletins/coronavirusandhomeworkingintheuk/april2020#main-points

 

https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/employmentandemployeetypes/bulletins/coronavirusandhomeworkingintheuk/april2020#main-points

 

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases/bulletins/coronavirustheukeconomyandsocietyfasterindicators/21january2021

 

https://www.wired.co.uk/article/covid-19-home-printer-wireless

 

https://www.hayesconnor.co.uk/news-and-resources/reports/data-breach-statistics-2020/

 

https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/working-from-home/

 

 

 

Article rating:

vote data

Leave a reply

Holding a mirror up to the industry: Jeff Dewing, Cloudfm CEO. (photo: Cloudfm Group)
News Editor  - 31.03.2021

Exposing Widespread FM Failures in the UK

A potentially explosive book by Cloudfm CEO, Jeff Dewing, contains allegations of widespread corporate failings in the UK's £120 billion market for facilities management services.

 (photo: Mindspace)
Efrat Fenigson  - 25.03.2021

Why Employees Need Better Options

Efrat Fenigson, Mindspace VP Marketing, explains why decisions about remote work require companies to look beyond possible financial savings.

Maisie's: the first community store to be launched by the partners. (photo: Compass Group (UK & Ireland))
News Editor  - 22.04.2021

Novel Self-Service Community Store Concept

A collaboration between Compass Group subsidiary ESS, Royal Naval Air Station (RNAS) Yeovilton and the UK Defence Infrastructure Organisation has developed a new convenience outlet concept...

EUMETSAT headquarters in Darmstadt, Hesse, Germany. (photo: LSDSL)
News Editor  - 22.04.2021

EUMETSAT Contract Award

Serco Germany has secured a six-year contract with an estimated value of £20 million to support the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT).

 (photo: est.Creative)
News Editor  - 22.04.2021

Prologis Extends Green Building Leadership

Logistics real estate investor Prologis, Inc, has announced the launch of the first LEED v4 for Core and Shell Volume Program for the U.S. logistics real estate sector.