Register
 (photo: Alexandre Godreau)
09.05.2019, 10:00

Repurposing Retail Spaces

Furnishing & Decor, White Papers & Briefings, EMEA
New retail premises frequently require robust design features that extend beyond visual and aesthetic considerations.

 

Much depends on the nature of the products that are being offered, and on their storage, logistics and display requirements.

 

Concrete flooring

If you’re worried about carpet getting stained, or wooden floors not being able to take the punishment over time, then concrete can be a brilliantly simple option. Not only is concrete incredibly robust, but it can also be more stylistic than you might think. You can opt for polished concrete with a sheer effect that can be seen in countless restaurants and office spaces. Contacting flooring experts will help you gain some idea of what can be achieved on your premises.


Utilise lighting

If you have to be practical about other features such as storage and flooring, then allow yourself to be playful with lighting. Using creative hanging fixtures, and maybe even coloured lighting, can add creativity where it’s needed. You could even use custom-shaped neon lights to add your branding to the premises, as well as a bit of vibrancy. Putting a design focus on the lighting fixtures allows you to add texture and style to a room without having to rely on coloured wallpaper or paintings.


Use steel and metal shelving

If you’re worried about metal shelving giving your premises the look and feel of a garage, then don’t panic. Not only does the metal frames and piping used to hold up metal shelving make it incredibly robust, but a silver or copper effect can be surprisingly neutral or stylish. Using shelving racks can also be used as a divider to section off certain areas of your premises. If you have stock to display on one side, but would like somewhere to take visitors for a consultation, this could be the perfect answer.


Remember the importance of scale

When you’re mapping out how your company’s premises are going to look, remember to draw all the items on your diagram to scale. While it’s playful to give a rough idea of what the final design will look like, you could run into some real problems if you haven’t factored in how everything will exactly fit. By factoring in the exact scale of units and furniture, you won’t be left with the feeling that certain items are overpowering the entire room.

 

Practicality and design should not remain singular and opposed to each other. While sometimes it’s necessary to utilise hard-wearing materials, there’s no reason why products should not be presented beautifully, or why design can be added later using other features such as lighting. If you’re looking to invite people into your shop floor, it’s wise to ensure that it’s appealing as well as robust.

 

Article rating:

vote data

Leave a reply

 (photo: Caio Christofoli)
News Editor  - 23.06.2020, 11:17

BSI Introduces Workplace Hygiene Solution

BSI has launched a suite of products and services to help organisations address operational challenges presented by the Covid-19 pandemic.

 (photo: Brett Sayles)
FM Editor  - 16.06.2020, 10:05

A Risk-free Home Working Revolution?

An analysis of 750 academic papers for the Advanced Workplace Institute (AWI) has identified trust, social cohesion, and information sharing as potential casualties of the migration towards working...

 (photo: )
FM Editor  - 18.12.2019, 16:08

The Drains of Christmas Future

UK wastewater and drainage solutions provider Lanes Group has reimagined "A Christmas Carol" into a story about the importance of clean drains.

 (photo: )
FM Editor  - 18.12.2019, 13:27

University of Manchester Clean Room Contract

SPIE UK has won an 18-month design, supply, install and commission contract for a clean room at The University of Manchester, as part of a new build being constructed by Balfour Beatty.